Exclusive: Wells Fargo sanctions are on ice under Trump official – sources

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The new acting head of the U.S. consumer finance watchdog is reviewing whether Wells Fargo & Co (WFC.N) should pay tens of millions of dollars over alleged mortgage lending abuse, according to three sources familiar with the dispute.

FILE PHOTO – The sign outside the Wells Fargo & Co. bank in downtown Denver April 13, 2016. REUTERS/Rick Wilking

The San Francisco-based bank said in October that it would refund homebuyers who were wrongly charged fees to secure low mortgage rates – a black mark against a lender which has already been roiled by scandal over its treatment of customers.

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) had been investigating the mortgage issue since early this year, said one current and two former officials. The agency accepted an internal review from Wells Fargo and set settlement terms in early November, said the sources, who were not authorized to speak about internal discussions.

But that matter and roughly a dozen others are in question now that Mick Mulvaney, the new interim agency chief tapped by President Donald Trump, has said he is reviewing the agency’s prior work.

Richard Cordray, the former CFPB director who initiated the Wells Fargo action, approved the terms of a possible settlement before stepping down, said the sources.

But Mulvaney has pledged to examine all agency enforcement work that Cordray had left unfinished, which includes the potential Wells Fargo sanctions.

Wells Fargo has said the charges could have affected more than 100,000 borrowers.

In an interview with the Washington Times newspaper last week, Mulvaney said he is reviewing 14 open enforcement matters that Cordray left on his desk.

FILE PHOTO – Office of Management and Budget (OMB) Director Mick Mulvaney speaks to the media at the U.S. Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB), where he began work earlier in the day after being named acting director by U.S. President Donald Trump in Washington November 27, 2017. REUTERS/Joshua Roberts

A CFPB official said that review should not taint any eventual settlements.

“Acting Director Mulvaney made it clear to staff that any pause should not and will not impact any ongoing negotiations,” said John Czwartacki, an adviser to Mulvaney.

Mulvaney has moved swiftly to change course at the CFPB, which was created during President Barack Obama’s administration and has forced financial services companies to pay out $12 billion in fines and consumer relief.

No new staff will be hired and no new rules will be written for industry until a review of the agency is completed, Mulvaney has said.

Before he took charge of the CFPB, Mulvaney had been one of its vocal critics and called the bureau a “joke.”

Mulvaney is now in a legal fight with Leandra English, another senior CFPB official, over who should lead the agency until a permanent chief can be appointed.

English has vowed to defend the bureau’s existing consumer protections while Mulvaney has pledged to have the agency step out of the way of business.

A federal court has so far endorsed Mulvaney’s position at the top of the bureau, but English is continuing a legal fight.

Reporting by Patrick Rucker and Pete Schroeder; Editing by Jonathan Oatis

Our Standards:The Thomson Reuters Trust Principles.
No Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

News
Local guide puts Edmonton’s lesser-known attractions on the map

A new map is being billed as a guide to Edmonton for people who don’t want to see the same stuff everyone else sees.“The intention of this map is to show you some great little hole-in-the-wall restaurants, or a great river valley lookout or a piece of public art you’ve …

News
Travelling homes

“We’re in the business of making dreams come true.” Not the words of a Hollywood director or even a toy company boss, but what Bart Day was told during his interview for his role as head of marketing for Bailey of Bristol, which is one of Europe’s biggest caravan manufacturers. …

News
Love in North Korea

Every night before going to bed, US defector Charles Jenkins turned to Hitomi Soga, the woman North Korea had forced him to marry, and kissed her three times. “Oyasumi” he said, using her native Japanese. “Goodnight”, she replied in English, the language of his North Carolina childhood. “We did this …